Monday, May 10, 2010

Monday's Montage: Outliers

My Purge-a-palooza is still continuing on (apparently, it's a slow purge), but I've decided my blog break has been long enough. I hope everyone is well.

I thought today it might be fun to give you a book recommendation. In my book club we just read Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell.
It was a very interesting study about what makes people successes--discussing the reasons they stand out from the crowd--why they are "outliers." If you've heard about the 10,000 hours to professional status, this is where it comes from--a very interesting concept and Gladwell makes a great case for it. The example of The Beatles and their success made so much sense. (For writers, I've heard this as the 1 million words concept.)

There are so many compelling arguments for the premises Gladwell puts forth that it is an intriguing read. Before I started the book, I was afraid that it would drag, but I found that I was so interested in what he had to say that I had a hard time putting it down.

I was fascinated with Gladwell's account of hockey players in Canada and soccer players in Europe, etc., and baseball players in the US, and how certain kids are much more likely to succeed.

I didn't necessarily agree with him on everything, and sometimes there were parts that dragged. The discussion on airlines and problems with communication got a bit longwinded and lost focus somewhat, but his points there were well made in the end and pretty scary.

All in all, it was a great read.

17 comments:

Danyelle said...

*have missed you* :) Thanks for the book recommendation. It sounds really interesting. :D

Piedmont Writer said...

Sounds like a great read. Thanks for the recommend. Things are a little hairy still, so I'll let you know when lunch is a good idea again.

Patti said...

My husband is obsessed with this book. Every time a kid does well or bad, he quotes it. (It's the Matthew effect).

Good luck on your purging.

Grace said...

You're Back!!! Love to read your blog.

Crimey said...

Welcome back and thanks for the recommendation. I've been considering watching The Secret on video (instead of reading the book) because so many people have said it was a guide to why people are successful, but I haven't gotten around to it yet.

Jessie Oliveros said...

I love that you call it Purge-a-palooza. I need one of those. Anyway, thanks for the rec. I forgot about that one thing called nonfiction.

Susan R. Mills said...

Just came back from a blog break myself. Sounds like an interesting book. I'll have put on my short list of nonfiction.

Solvang Sherrie said...

I have heard so many people say that they love this book. I need to add it to my list.

sarahjayne smythe said...

Welcome back and thanks for the rec. It sounds like a great read.

Tess said...

so glad to have you back.

I came to tell you yes, you were right about the prologue needing to go on Love.

and, you were right about the chaps running too long (I tend to do that)

probably other things, too ... but those things I didn't listen to your advice and when I got my editorial notes, I thought "Dang that Lois .. she was right again!"

thanks for your help. And, I've not heard of this read. Maybe I'll add it to the TBR pile.

ali said...

Interesting! I've wanted to read this book for some time, but I kept forgetting to write the title down and could never remember, lol. I already wrote it down this time though, so I'll pick it up when I get the chance.

Thanks for the review! ♥

Carolyn V. said...

I will add it to my tbr list. It sounds so interesting. =)

Lady Glamis said...

Wow, that sounds interesting! So will you try to be an outlier now? Hehe. What made the end scary?

Rebecca Ramsey said...

How funny. I just turned that book back into the library today. I didn't get around to reading it, but now I may have to check it out again and give it try #2. I've heard lots of people talking about it. Interesting.

PJ Hoover said...

Thanks for the awesome rec, and welcome back!

Elana Johnson said...

Sounds interesting. I don't typically read anything but fiction (I'm shallow like that), but this does sound like something I'd like.

Joe Iriarte said...

I've been absent from the blogosphere myself for a bit--welcome back!

I've heard of the book and blogged about the concept, but I haven't read it. I find the idea empowering. I suppose one might find 10,000 hours a daunting number, but it just tells me that I can get so much better than I am right now, that being really good at something is not beyond my reach. When I heard about this, it made me more determined than ever to put in my hours!